Representing Disabled Clients for Over 25 Years

Social Security Lawyer
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Donald H. Peters

248-549-3485

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Types of Disability Claims

Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income (SSD) AND (SSI)

When you are no longer able to work on a regular basis, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability (SSD) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.
Under the law, "disability" means the "inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medically determinable physical or mental impairment which can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months or result in death."
In other words, you may qualify if:

  1. You are unable to work;
  2. You have a physical or mental disability (which can be proven with medical records);
  3. Your disability will last at least 12 months or may result in death;

SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME BENEFITS (SSI)

Supplemental Security Income Benefits (SSI) benefits are paid to people who are both poor and disabled. In addition, SSI children's disability benefits are paid to children 18 years old and younger who are disabled and whose parents or guardians are poor.

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS (SSD)

Generally, Social Security Disability Benefits (SSD) are paid to disabled people who have some documented work history.

Generally, There are at least five major types of Social Security disability benefits. 

Disability Insurance Benefits is the most important type of Social Security Disability benefits.  It goes to individuals who have worked in recent years (five out of the last 10 years in most cases) who are now disabled. 

Disabled Widow's and Widower's Benefits are paid to individuals who are at least 50 and become disabled within a certain amount of time after the death of their husband or wife.  The late husband or wife must have worked enough under Social Security to be insured.

Disabled Adult Child Benefits go to the children of persons who are deceased or who are drawing Social Security disability or retirement benefits.  The child must have become disabled before age 22.  For Disability Insurance Benefits, Disabled Widow's or Widower's Benefits and Disabled Adult Child benefits, it does not matter whether the disabled individual is rich or poor.  Benefits are paid based upon a Social Security earnings record. 

Supplemental Security Income benefits, however, are paid to individuals who are poor and who are disabled.  It does not matter for SSI whether an individual has worked in the past or not. 

SSI child's disability benefits are a variety of SSI benefits paid to children under the age of 18 who are disabled.  The way in which disability is determined is a bit different for children.

BENEFITS PAYABLE TO YOUR SPOUSE

Click here for Divorced Spouse Benefits

When benefits are payable to your spouse:
Age 62 or older, unless he or she collects a higher Social Security benefit based on his or her earnings record. The spouse benefit amount will be permanently reduced by a percentage based on the number of months up to his or her full retirement age.

At any age if he or she is caring for your child under age 16 or disabled and receiving Social Security benefits.
Your spouse would receive these benefits until the child reaches age 16. At that time, the child's benefits continue, but your spouse's benefits stop unless he or she is old enough to receive retirement benefits (age 62 or older) or survivor benefits as a widow or widower (age 60).

IF YOUR SPOUSE ALSO WORKED UNDER SOCIAL SECURITY

If your spouse is eligible for retirement benefits on his or her own record, Social Security will always pay that amount first. But if the spouse benefit that is payable on your record is a higher amount, he or she will get a combination of benefits that equals that higher amount.

It doesn't matter if your spouse starts getting benefits before, after, or at the same time you do– Social Security we will check both records to make sure that your spouse gets the higher amount whenever he or she becomes entitled to it.

If your spouse will also receive a pension based on work not covered by Social Security, such as government or foreign work, his or her Social Security benefit on your record may be affected.

DIVORCED SPOUSE BENEFITS

If you are divorced, even if you have remarried, your ex-spouse may qualify for benefits on your record.

(If your ex-spouse will also receive a pension based on work not covered by Social Security, such as government or foreign work, his or her Social Security benefit on your record may be affected.)

To qualify on your record, your ex-spouse must:

  • Have been married to you for at least 10 years;
  • Be at least 62 years old;
  • Be unmarried; and
  • Not be eligible for an equal or higher benefit on his or her own Social Security record, or on someone else's Social Security record.

Note: The amount of benefits payable to your divorced spouse has no effect on the amount of benefits you or your current spouse may receive.

Call Now!

If you wish to hire a licensed Attorney to help win your claim, call Social Security Professionals.

Call Social Security Professionals now to discuss your claim for free!

You need no money to hire Attorney Donald H. Peters

(248) 549-3485
FREE CONSULTATION

Call Social Security Professionals now to discuss your claim for free

You need no money to hire Attorney Donald H. Peters

(248) 549-3485
FREE CONSULTATION

Southfield Lawyer Donald Peters of the Law Office of Donald H. Peters, P.C. in Southfield, Michigan, handles Social Security Disability claims throughout Michigan and in the Tri-County Metro Detroit area including Detroit, Southfield, Novi, Warren, Royal Oak, Roseville, Livonia, Mount Clemens, Sterling Heights, Farmington Hills, Birmingham, Berkley, Oak Park, West Bloomfield, Ann Arbor, Eastpointe, Waterford, Flint, Canton, Taylor, Romulus, Westland, Clinton Township, Troy, Dearborn, Brighton, Howell, Pontiac, Rochester Hills,  as well as Wayne County, Oakland County, Macomb County, Ingham County, and Livingston County, Michigan.

Disclaimer

Material presented on the Social Security Professionals website is intended for general informational purposes only.  It is not intended as professional advice in any manner and should not be construed as such.  Individuals should never act upon any information provided in a website except that you should seek the advice of an Attorney. 

For the most up to date content regarding Social Security Disability please reference the Social Security Administration's website.

You may call Social Security Professionals and discuss your claim for free at:

(248) 549-3485